Sample Chapter – July 10, 1754, – Albany Plan of Union Adopted

Albany Plan of Union
When Benjamin Franklin learned that colonial leaders planned a Congress in Albany, New York in 1754 to plan united action on several issues he printed the cartoon “Join or Die,” in his newspaper. The cartoon appeared in The Pennsylvania Gazette and featured a dead snake cut into thirteen pieces, the implication being that the colonies, like a snake cut into pieces, would perish if they remained disunited. Continue reading Sample Chapter – July 10, 1754, – Albany Plan of Union Adopted

Sample Chapter – Chapter title – April 18, 1775 – Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

Leaders of the colonial resistance belonging to the Boston Committee of Correspondence and the Massachusetts Committee of Safety had heard reports of the British plans to move against Lexington. The groups had hired Paul Revere to act as a messenger to carry letters back and forth between colonial leaders in various locations around Boston. One of the leaders contacted Revere on the evening of the 18th and told him that British troops were on the move and he should ride to Lexington to warn the leaders that were staying there that the British were on the march. Since colonial leaders had alre Continue reading Sample Chapter – Chapter title – April 18, 1775 – Midnight Ride of Paul Revere

Sample Chapter – First of the Colonist’s Advocate Letters

Benjamin Franklin resided in London during the turbulent years from 1764 through 1775. From his perch in the English capital, he watched as relations between England and her North American colonies unraveled. Initially sent to persuade the King to transform Pennsylvania from a proprietary colony to a royal one, he spent much of his time trying to persuade the English parliament to repeal the Stamp Act, and later the Townshend duties. His testimony before Parliament in January 1766 probably played a role in Parliament’s repeal of the hated Stamp Act. Continue reading Sample Chapter – First of the Colonist’s Advocate Letters

Colonial American History Stories – 1753 – 1763

Colonial American History Stories – 1753 – 1763 contains almost 300 history stories presented in a timeline that begins in 1755 with the hanging of the Liberty Bell and ends with the Treaty of Paris that ended the French and Indian War. This journal of historical events mark the beginnings of the United States and serve as a wonderful guide of American history. Continue reading Colonial American History Stories – 1753 – 1763

Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753

Colonial American History Stories – 1215 – 1664 contains almost 300 history stories presented in a timeline that begins in 1655 with the performance of the first documented play performed in British North America and ends with the switch from the Julian to the Gregorian Calendar in 1752. This journal of historical events mark the beginnings of the United States and serve as a wonderful guide of American history. Continue reading Colonial American History Stories – 1665 – 1753

Sample Chapter – The Earliest Possible Date for the First Thanksgiving Day

September 21, 1621 – The Earliest Possible Date for the First Thanksgiving Day
Thanksgiving feasts were a common practice for the European settlers and their native neighbors. It was tradition for the Europeans to set aside days of thanksgiving. They celebrated for a bountiful harvest, drought-ending rains or other providential events. These events did not have any connection with their worship service. They were set during week and commonly involved fasting beforehand. After the fasting, they would have one or several days of celebratory feasting. The Indians had similar traditions. They had thanksgiving celebrations sporadically throughout the year for special events. Thus, both peoples had traditions of this type of celebration. Continue reading Sample Chapter – The Earliest Possible Date for the First Thanksgiving Day

Sample Chapter – Evolution of Road Building Materials

The first roads developed from well used places like stream and river fords, mountain passes and other high traffic areas. From there these early roads most likely followed game trails and natural features of the land. Sometimes extensive networks developed which connected settlements for trade and travel, though they were little more than dirt paths in most cases. The predominant traffic on these early roads would have been foot traffic. Later on horses with travois and then wagons would have used them. Continue reading Sample Chapter – Evolution of Road Building Materials